Alzheimer’s Prevention - Keep Your Brain Healthy

You have the power to take charge of your brain health. Regardless of your age or background, there are simple steps you can take to help lower your risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s disease.

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Woman exercising and maintaining healthy diet for brain health.
Woman exercising and maintaining healthy diet for brain health.
Woman exercising and maintaining healthy diet for brain health.

Helping Put Your Brain Health In Your Hands

One of the challenges in Alzheimer’s disease is the lack of early detection. Too often people don’t seek help until they begin to notice Alzheimer’s symptoms in themselves or a loved one.

In recent years, research has shown that Alzheimer’s prevention is possible. The great news is that it is never too early or too late to make changes that can help prevent or delay dementia. By making adjustments to your daily routine, you can help improve and maintain a healthy brain. These changes can include eating a healthy diet, staying active by moving your body, and socializing with friends and family.

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s provides information and resources to help anyone seeking to take control of their cognitive health.

An older couple choosing healthy foods at their grocery store to help improve their brain health

Eat Healthy Food

The food you eat makes a big difference to your brain health. Find out the right foods for healthy aging, learn how to find them on a budget, and try some sample menus.

A mother and her adult daughter sharing an embrace

Limit Alcohol

Keep your brain healthy by limiting alcohol and drinking moderately, if at all. Excessive drinking may lead to a decline in brain health; however, drinking in moderation has not been found to increase or decrease the risk of dementia according to Alzheimer’s Disease International.

A group of women gathered around a picnic table, laughing together as they make homemade quacamole

Don’t Smoke

Smoking increases the risk of heart attacks, strokes, lung diseases, and blood pressure. All of which negatively affect brain health.

A woman sits on her living room floor, leaning on an exercise ball after completing her workout to keep her brain healthy

Keep Your Mind Active

There are many fun activities that can help your brain health and potentially prevent cognitive health decline. Play games, learn new skills, read, solve brain puzzles.

A group of men and women outside on a jog as they help each other stay active to maintain their brain health

Exercise and Stay Fit

Keep yourself physically active. Older adults should get regular moderate exercise each week. This can include walking, swimming, or biking. The key is finding a routine that’s right for you.

A woman sitting on the edge of her bed after she wakes up from a refreshing night's sleep

Get Enough Sleep

Sleep helps reduce the buildup of proteins linked to Alzheimer’s disease. It also helps you feel better and keeps your immune system healthy. Learn more about the link between Alzheimer’s and sleep, and how you can get your brain the rest it needs.

An older couple sitting outside, enjoying fresh air and laughing with friends

Keep in Touch

Staying in touch with friends and family helps keep the brain healthy. Research shows that talking to people and spending time with them can slow rates of memory problems. Learn how you can stay socially engaged.

A gentelman in the foreground smiling and walking on the beach while a woman in the background smiles and walks behind him

Take Care of Common Health Problems

Your brain health depends on your body’s health. It’s important to take care of other conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes and depression. Managing common health conditions can help prevent memory loss and cognitive decline.

Is Alzheimer's Prevention Possible?

Alzheimer's disease is complicated, and while there are factors that fall outside of your control, the best strategy to delay or prevent cognitive decline is by making healthy lifestyle changes. Eat a healthy and balanced diet, maintain an active social life, stay physically fit, keep your mind active, have regular doctor checkups, and avoid smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.

Research is ongoing, but we know that there is evidence that suggests that all of these factors help in Alzheimer’s prevention. Making these lifestyle changes are also good for overall health which leads to better brain health.

Understanding the stages of Alzheimer’s disease will help you create a plan of action for you or your loved one so that you can find the support and local resources available and make informed decisions about an Alzheimer’s diagnosis.

An older couple choosing healthy foods at their grocery store to help improve their brain health

Eat Healthy Food

The food you eat makes a big difference to your brain health. Find out the right foods for healthy aging, learn how to find them on a budget, and try some sample menus.

A mother and her adult daughter sharing an embrace

Limit Alcohol

Keep your brain healthy by limiting alcohol and drinking moderately, if at all. Excessive drinking may lead to a decline in brain health; however, drinking in moderation has not been found to increase or decrease the risk of dementia according to Alzheimer’s Disease International.

A group of women gathered around a picnic table, laughing together as they make homemade quacamole

Don’t Smoke

Smoking increases the risk of heart attacks, strokes, lung diseases, and blood pressure. All of which negatively affect brain health.

A woman sits on her living room floor, leaning on an exercise ball after completing her workout to keep her brain healthy

Keep Your Mind Active

There are many fun activities that can help your brain health and potentially prevent cognitive health decline. Play games, learn new skills, read, solve brain puzzles.

A group of men and women outside on a jog as they help each other stay active to maintain their brain health

Exercise and Stay Fit

Keep yourself physically active. Older adults should get regular moderate exercise each week. This can include walking, swimming, or biking. The key is finding a routine that’s right for you.

A woman sitting on the edge of her bed after she wakes up from a refreshing night's sleep

Get Enough Sleep

Sleep helps reduce the buildup of proteins linked to Alzheimer’s disease. It also helps you feel better and keeps your immune system healthy. Learn more about the link between Alzheimer’s and sleep, and how you can get your brain the rest it needs.

An older couple sitting outside, enjoying fresh air and laughing with friends

Keep in Touch

Staying in touch with friends and family helps keep the brain healthy. Research shows that talking to people and spending time with them can slow rates of memory problems. Learn how you can stay socially engaged.

A gentelman in the foreground smiling and walking on the beach while a woman in the background smiles and walks behind him

Take Care of Common Health Problems

Your brain health depends on your body’s health. It’s important to take care of other conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes and depression. Managing common health conditions can help prevent memory loss and cognitive decline.

Is Alzheimer's Prevention Possible?

Alzheimer's disease is complicated, and while there are factors that fall outside of your control, the best strategy to delay or prevent cognitive decline is by making healthy lifestyle changes. Eat a healthy and balanced diet, maintain an active social life, stay physically fit, keep your mind active, have regular doctor checkups, and avoid smoking and excessive alcohol consumption.

Research is ongoing, but we know that there is evidence that suggests that all of these factors help in Alzheimer’s prevention. Making these lifestyle changes are also good for overall health which leads to better brain health.

Understanding the stages of Alzheimer’s disease will help you create a plan of action for you or your loved one so that you can find the support and local resources available and make informed decisions about an Alzheimer’s diagnosis.