Resources for Alzheimer’s Caregivers

When it comes to caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease, it is not uncommon to put your loved ones needs above your own. But a willingness to use all the support available to you is never a sign of weakness. It shows strength, compassion, and an openness to do everything possible to provide the best care for your loved one.

Women supporting a family member with Alzheimer's.
Women supporting a family member with Alzheimer's.
Women supporting a family member with Alzheimer's.

Helping Alzheimer’s Caregivers Care for Themselves

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s helps connect Alzheimer’s caregivers to resources and support you need in order to provide the best care, while also meeting your own needs.

An Alzheimer's caregiver heads to an outdoor yoga class with a group of her friends

Self-Care Tips for the Alzheimer’s Caregiver

Knowing when to prioritize your own health and care is an important part of being an Alzheimer’s caregiver and can actually help you provide the best care for your loved one. Ask for help when you need it and find a support system that works best for you. Find tips like these and more in the Alzheimer’s Caregiver toolkit.

A father and his adult daughter look at BrainGuide together and learn how to support each other in their brain health journey

Your Family’s Journey with Memory Loss

If someone in your family is experiencing memory loss or has received a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or dementia, it can bring on many difficult emotions for your entire family. But it’s important to remember that you are not alone and the emotions you may feel are normal. Learning how to support each other can help everyone get ready for the road ahead. If you have become the primary person caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease, it’s especially important to work with other family members to make sure the support system is in place for you and your loved one.

A couple prepares dinner as they enjoy some quality time together

What to Expect When You Become an Alzheimer’s Caregiver

Taking care of a loved one with Alzheimer’s can be hard on your body, your mind, and your emotions. Learning more about Alzheimer’s disease, knowing what to expect, and planning ahead of time can make a big difference.

There are several things you can do to make sure you’re taking care of the needs of your loved one while also meeting your own needs.

A grandmother enjoys time with her daughter and grandchild as they help the child understand more about Alzheimer's disease

How to Raise the Topic With Your Family

It’s important to help your family, including children, understand what is happening when you or a loved one has Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. Talk about what changes might happen because of the disease. If they have questions, give honest, simple, and open answers. Tell them that it is normal for them to feel sad, angry, or upset. Talk to them about their feelings and let them know how they can support you as the primary Alzheimer’s caregiver.

Why is it Important for Caregivers to Practice Self-Care? 

You can only give the best care to your loved one if you’re also taking the best care of yourself. Alzheimer’s caregivers can take some small, practical steps to make sure you have the support you need. Communicate with the person you are caring for; a successful caregiver dynamic should be a two-way relationship. Make and stick to a routine, including activities that you enjoy. If you enjoy regular exercise, build that time into your weekly schedule. Learn about Alzheimer’s, so that you know what to expect and can plan ahead.

It’s also important to ask for support from others when you need it. Consider finding local resources and build your support network.

You can ask for help from family and friends, organizations in your community, or online. One of the best places to start to find services in your area is the Eldercare Locator. You can also join a local support group.

The UsAgainstAlzheimer’s Facebook community is another great place to find a supportive community.

An Alzheimer's caregiver heads to an outdoor yoga class with a group of her friends

Self-Care Tips for the Alzheimer’s Caregiver

Knowing when to prioritize your own health and care is an important part of being an Alzheimer’s caregiver and can actually help you provide the best care for your loved one. Ask for help when you need it and find a support system that works best for you. Find tips like these and more in the Alzheimer’s Caregiver toolkit.

A father and his adult daughter look at BrainGuide together and learn how to support each other in their brain health journey

Your Family’s Journey with Memory Loss

If someone in your family is experiencing memory loss or has received a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s or dementia, it can bring on many difficult emotions for your entire family. But it’s important to remember that you are not alone and the emotions you may feel are normal. Learning how to support each other can help everyone get ready for the road ahead. If you have become the primary person caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease, it’s especially important to work with other family members to make sure the support system is in place for you and your loved one.

A couple prepares dinner as they enjoy some quality time together

What to Expect When You Become an Alzheimer’s Caregiver

Taking care of a loved one with Alzheimer’s can be hard on your body, your mind, and your emotions. Learning more about Alzheimer’s disease, knowing what to expect, and planning ahead of time can make a big difference.

There are several things you can do to make sure you’re taking care of the needs of your loved one while also meeting your own needs.

A grandmother enjoys time with her daughter and grandchild as they help the child understand more about Alzheimer's disease

How to Raise the Topic With Your Family

It’s important to help your family, including children, understand what is happening when you or a loved one has Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia. Talk about what changes might happen because of the disease. If they have questions, give honest, simple, and open answers. Tell them that it is normal for them to feel sad, angry, or upset. Talk to them about their feelings and let them know how they can support you as the primary Alzheimer’s caregiver.

Why is it Important for Caregivers to Practice Self-Care? 

You can only give the best care to your loved one if you’re also taking the best care of yourself. Alzheimer’s caregivers can take some small, practical steps to make sure you have the support you need. Communicate with the person you are caring for; a successful caregiver dynamic should be a two-way relationship. Make and stick to a routine, including activities that you enjoy. If you enjoy regular exercise, build that time into your weekly schedule. Learn about Alzheimer’s, so that you know what to expect and can plan ahead.

It’s also important to ask for support from others when you need it. Consider finding local resources and build your support network.

You can ask for help from family and friends, organizations in your community, or online. One of the best places to start to find services in your area is the Eldercare Locator. You can also join a local support group.

The UsAgainstAlzheimer’s Facebook community is another great place to find a supportive community.