Signs of Dementia and Early Alzheimer's Symptoms

It’s not an easy subject, but learning the differences between normal “senior moments” and early signs of Alzheimer’s disease or signs of dementia is very important. Early awareness can maximize one of your most valuable resources in maintaining brain health: time.

The earlier you notice signs of Alzheimer’s disease, the sooner you and your loved ones can take action. The benefit of time can allow you to plan for future care, participate in research or clinical trials, and make healthy lifestyle changes that could help manage and delay the onset of symptoms. There are many actions you can take to help sustain your daily life with Alzheimer’s.

Couple discussing early signs of dementia.
Couple discussing early signs of dementia.
Couple discussing early signs of dementia.

Helping You Recognize Early Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s is helping families gain the upper hand in fighting cognitive decline by showing you and your loved ones how to spot common early signs of Alzheimer’s disease, so you can take action.

Three older men sitting together discussing the early signs and symtoms of Mild Cognitive Impairment

Understanding Mild Cognitive Impairment

Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is a health problem that changes how the brain works. MCI makes it harder to think and remember things. There are a few different types of MCI, but it is most often thought to be the earliest clinical stage of Alzheimer’s. Checking out early signs and symptoms of MCI can help you find more choices for treatment and support.

A father and his adult son sit on a park bench looking at the BrainGuide questionairre on a cell phone and discuss concerns

Talking to A Loved One About Memory Loss

If you’ve noticed a loved one beginning to show signs of MCI or Alzheimer’s disease, you might be unsure of how to address it with them. But the time to have the conversation is now, and we have a few tips to make it easier to talk to your loved one about memory loss.

A gentelman sitting on a couch while his wide leans over his shoulder as he shows her BrainGuide resources on his laptop

Spotting Early Symptoms and Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

People with memory problems may be first to notice that they are confused, have trouble with normal activities, or have other symptoms. Or, family and friends may be the first to notice. In either case, it’s important to know what to look for. Changes in mood or behavior, struggling with familiar activities, difficulty speaking or writing, and changes in vision or perception can be early signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

Symptoms can go on for years. But they can also get worse quickly. It is important to talk to a doctor as soon as you notice them. This can help you and your loved one find out what’s wrong and make a plan.

A women enjoying a cup of coffee at her computer as she learns more about the stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

Current research suggests that there are 5 stages of Alzheimer’s stages: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Mild, Moderate, Severe, and Very Severe. Symptoms will vary from person to person, but there are common aspects for each stage of Alzheimer’s disease. The more you understand about each of them, the better prepared you and your loved ones can be.

What can I do if I Notice Signs of Dementia or Alzheimer’s?

Once you notice signs of dementia or Alzheimer’s there are many actions you can take. A first step when you are noticing changes in your or a loved one’s memory is taking the BrainGuide Memory Questionnaire. You may also want to talk to a doctor about signs of Alzheimer’s disease and other memory concerns.

There are many actions you can take to help sustain daily life with Alzheimer’s. Several lifestyle changes can even help reduce or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s symptoms. As you navigate caring for yourself or a loved one, UsAgainstAlzheimer’s offers many resources you can access along your journey.

Three older men sitting together discussing the early signs and symtoms of Mild Cognitive Impairment

Understanding Mild Cognitive Impairment

Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is a health problem that changes how the brain works. MCI makes it harder to think and remember things. There are a few different types of MCI, but it is most often thought to be the earliest clinical stage of Alzheimer’s. Checking out early signs and symptoms of MCI can help you find more choices for treatment and support.

A father and his adult son sit on a park bench looking at the BrainGuide questionairre on a cell phone and discuss concerns

Talking to A Loved One About Memory Loss

If you’ve noticed a loved one beginning to show signs of MCI or Alzheimer’s disease, you might be unsure of how to address it with them. But the time to have the conversation is now, and we have a few tips to make it easier to talk to your loved one about memory loss.

A gentelman sitting on a couch while his wide leans over his shoulder as he shows her BrainGuide resources on his laptop

Spotting Early Symptoms and Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

People with memory problems may be first to notice that they are confused, have trouble with normal activities, or have other symptoms. Or, family and friends may be the first to notice. In either case, it’s important to know what to look for. Changes in mood or behavior, struggling with familiar activities, difficulty speaking or writing, and changes in vision or perception can be early signs of Alzheimer’s disease.

Symptoms can go on for years. But they can also get worse quickly. It is important to talk to a doctor as soon as you notice them. This can help you and your loved one find out what’s wrong and make a plan.

A women enjoying a cup of coffee at her computer as she learns more about the stages of Alzheimer's Disease.

Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease

Current research suggests that there are 5 stages of Alzheimer’s stages: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Mild, Moderate, Severe, and Very Severe. Symptoms will vary from person to person, but there are common aspects for each stage of Alzheimer’s disease. The more you understand about each of them, the better prepared you and your loved ones can be.

What can I do if I Notice Signs of Dementia or Alzheimer’s?

Once you notice signs of dementia or Alzheimer’s there are many actions you can take. A first step when you are noticing changes in your or a loved one’s memory is taking the BrainGuide Memory Questionnaire. You may also want to talk to a doctor about signs of Alzheimer’s disease and other memory concerns.

There are many actions you can take to help sustain daily life with Alzheimer’s. Several lifestyle changes can even help reduce or delay the onset of Alzheimer’s symptoms. As you navigate caring for yourself or a loved one, UsAgainstAlzheimer’s offers many resources you can access along your journey.

Resources for Detecting Signs of Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease

Take a closer look at research and information that can help you spot signs of Alzheimer’s disease or signs of dementia from these sources of trusted information.

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