Brain Health for All

No two brains are exactly alike. Like other organs in the human body, the brain changes as it ages. Wisdom and expertise can increase with age, while the speed of processing information, making decisions, and recall of information can slow down.

When changes in a person’s cognitive ability affects their daily life, it may be a sign that something other than normal aging is happening.

Alzheimer’s disease is NOT a normal part of aging. One of the earliest noticeable symptoms of Alzheimer’s and related dementias is something called Subjective Cognitive Decline. Subjective Cognitive Decline is the self-reported experience of worsening or more frequent confusion or memory loss.

Brain health and Alzheimer’s affects people differently depending on race, gender, genetics, environmental and social factors, and more, resulting in African Americans being twice as likely and Latinos 1.5 times as likely to develop Alzheimer’s, compared to non-Hispanic Whites. Yet, the disproportionate impact of Alzheimer’s disease on people of color and women is creating ripple effects across families and communities.

Below are tailored resources to help empower families and communities to make positive choices to protect their brain health.

Prevent Alzheimer's disease through community support.
Prevent Alzheimer's disease through community support.
Prevent Alzheimer's disease through community support.

These resources are brought to you by

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s Center for Brain Health Equity

The Center for Brain Health Equity partners with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), subject matter experts and community-based organizations to address brain health disparities.
Learn more about the work we’re doing to reduce Alzheimer’s related health disparities here

Brain Health Resources for All Communities

Brain Health in Women

Women are at a higher risk for developing Alzheimer's disease compared to men; women are also more likely to take on caregiver responsibilities. Check out the tailored brain health and caregiving resources below for more information:

Brain Health in African American People

African American people are two times more likely to develop Alzheimer's than non-Latino White Americans. Check out the tailored brain health and caregiving resources below for more information:

Brain Health in Latino People

Latino people are 1.5x more likely to get Alzheimer's than non-Latino White Americans. Check out the tailored brain health and caregiving resources below for more information:

Brain Health in Asian American and Pacific Islander

1 in 13 Asian, Native Hawaiian, or other Pacific Islander Adults Experience Subjective Cognitive Decline. Check out the tailored brain health resource below for more information:

Brain Health in American Indian and Alaska Native People

1 in 5 American Indian/Alaska Native Adults Experience Subjective Cognitive Decline. Check out the tailored brain health and caregiving resources below for more information:

Helping Put Your Brain Health In Your Hands

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s provides information and resources to help anyone seeking to take control of their Brain Health.

A glass and a bowl

Eat Healthy Food

Healthy eating habits make a big difference for cognitive health. Find out the right foods for healthy aging, learn how to find them on a budget, and try some sample menus.

A shoe and a dumbbell

Get Exercise and Stay Fit

Staying fit helps keep the brain healthy. Learn how to make an exercise plan that is right for you.

A cloud on a crescent moon

Get Enough Sleep

Sleep helps reduce the buildup of proteins associated with Alzheimer’s disease. It also helps you feel better and keeps your immune system healthy. Learn more about the link between Alzheimer’s and sleep, and how you can get your brain the rest it needs.

A tablet and a message

Keep in Touch

Staying social helps keep your brain healthy. Research shows that talking to people and spending time with friends and family can improve cognitive health and slow rates of memory problems. Learn how you can help your loved one to get these benefits.

A heart with a line chart

Take Care of Common Health Problems

Your cognitive health depends on your body’s health. It’s important to take care of other conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes and depression. This can help to prevent memory loss and cognitive decline.

Eat Healthy Food

Healthy eating habits make a big difference for cognitive health. Find out the right foods for healthy aging, learn how to find them on a budget, and try some sample menus.

Get Exercise and Stay Fit

Staying fit helps keep the brain healthy. Learn how to make an exercise plan that is right for you.

Get Enough Sleep

Sleep helps reduce the buildup of proteins associated with Alzheimer’s disease. It also helps you feel better and keeps your immune system healthy. Learn more about the link between Alzheimer’s and sleep, and how you can get your brain the rest it needs.

Keep in Touch

Staying social helps keep your brain healthy. Research shows that talking to people and spending time with friends and family can improve cognitive health and slow rates of memory problems. Learn how you can help your loved one to get these benefits.

Take Care of Common Health Problems

Your cognitive health depends on your body’s health. It’s important to take care of other conditions like high blood pressure, diabetes and depression. This can help to prevent memory loss and cognitive decline.

Digital content on this page was developed with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of a financial assistance award (1NU58DP006781) totaling $1,500,000 with 100 percent funded by CDC/HHS. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement by, CDC/HHS, or the U.S. Government.