Keep Your Brain Healthy

Healthy Food for a Healthy Brain

The research is clear. Long-term studies find that older adults who regularly eat a healthy diet have a lower risk of cognitive decline.1,2 Research also tells a balanced diet can increase brain tissue volume, especially in the part of the brain that controls memory.3

You Can Take Action

Try these strategies and tips to make healthy food choicees for you and your family, every day:

Find a mix of healthy foods that work for you.A balanced diet that combines whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and healthy proteins like nuts, fish, or eggs is best for your brain. Limit how much sugar, red meat, and cholesterol you eat, as these can increase your risk of cognitive decline.4
Stop smoking and limit alcohol.Smoking and alcohol are two key risk factors for Alzheimer’s.5
Plan ahead and stock up.Planning your meals each week can make it easier to eat right - check out sample meal plans from Be Brain Powerful and the National Institute on Aging. When you go to the store, look for the ingredients you need for that week’s meals and stock up on healthy staples like whole grain cereal, dried fruit, and pasta.
Ask for help.If you’re unsure about food choices or want personalized advice, ask your doctor, a nutrionist, or other health professional for specific information.
Keep it up.The most important part of a healthy diet is sticking with it so the brain health benefits can build over time. If you slip up, don’t give up - just keep trying new foods, meals, and strategies until you find what works for you and your family.
Find a mix of healthy foods that work for you.A balanced diet that combines whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and healthy proteins like nuts, fish, or eggs is best for your brain. Limit how much sugar, red meat, and cholesterol you eat, as these can increase your risk of cognitive decline.4
Stop smoking and limit alcohol.Smoking and alcohol are two key risk factors for Alzheimer’s.5
Plan ahead and stock up.Planning your meals each week can make it easier to eat right - check out sample meal plans from Be Brain Powerful and the National Institute on Aging. When you go to the store, look for the ingredients you need for that week’s meals and stock up on healthy staples like whole grain cereal, dried fruit, and pasta.
Ask for help.If you’re unsure about food choices or want personalized advice, ask your doctor, a nutrionist, or other health professional for specific information.
Keep it up.The most important part of a healthy diet is sticking with it so the brain health benefits can build over time. If you slip up, don’t give up - just keep trying new foods, meals, and strategies until you find what works for you and your family.