Alzheimer's Resources Near You

Types of Local Resources

Understanding the different types of resources available right in your community can be a big help to you or a loved one living with Alzheimer’s. Knowing ahead of time where to turn for help will not only save you time and effort when you need it, you may even discover resources you hadn’t known about before. Learn what’s near you and plan ahead to get the right support and services for your needs.

You Can Take Action

Finding support in your community is an important tool in living with Alzheimer’s. These local and national resources can help you find what you need close to home:

Eldercare Locator:This service from the U.S. Administration on Aging can help you find nearby organizations that provide support for older people and people with Alzheimer’s. These organizations can offer support services related to housing, elder rights, insurance benefits, transportation and more. You can use the Eldercare Locator online or by calling 1-800-677-1116.
Community Resource Finder:This tool from AARP and the Alzheimer’s Association provides links to community programs, medical services, home care and more. You can use the Community Resource Finder online or by calling 1-800-272-3900
Aging Services Resources:This website from the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging offers links to resources that help older adults and people with disabilities live with dignity. You can use the Aging Services page online.
Churches, senior centers, and other community organizations.Your church, senior center, or another community organization can also be a good starting point to find resources for Alzheimer’s disease. Ask the staff if they can point you towards the right services or contact people for your needs.
Professional care services.Companies or volunteer organizations can provide care services to people with Alzheimer’s disease, such as in-home care aides or adult day care. If you can’t afford to pay for care from a company, consider signing up for free or discounted care from a community organization, or check if you are able to cover the cost of care using medical benefits.
Support groups.Support groups can provide important connections to other people with Alzheimer’s or caregivers who are going through similar experiences. Check with local community organizations or the directories listed above to get connected to a support group in your area.
Eldercare Locator:This service from the U.S. Administration on Aging can help you find nearby organizations that provide support for older people and people with Alzheimer’s. These organizations can offer support services related to housing, elder rights, insurance benefits, transportation and more. You can use the Eldercare Locator online or by calling 1-800-677-1116.
Community Resource Finder:This tool from AARP and the Alzheimer’s Association provides links to community programs, medical services, home care and more. You can use the Community Resource Finder online or by calling 1-800-272-3900
Aging Services Resources:This website from the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging offers links to resources that help older adults and people with disabilities live with dignity. You can use the Aging Services page online.
Churches, senior centers, and other community organizations.Your church, senior center, or another community organization can also be a good starting point to find resources for Alzheimer’s disease. Ask the staff if they can point you towards the right services or contact people for your needs.
Professional care services.Companies or volunteer organizations can provide care services to people with Alzheimer’s disease, such as in-home care aides or adult day care. If you can’t afford to pay for care from a company, consider signing up for free or discounted care from a community organization, or check if you are able to cover the cost of care using medical benefits.
Support groups.Support groups can provide important connections to other people with Alzheimer’s or caregivers who are going through similar experiences. Check with local community organizations or the directories listed above to get connected to a support group in your area.