Alzheimer's Resources Near You

The Value of Respite

We all need a break sometimes. If you’re caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, respite care can help you take the time you need to rest and recharge. Options like adult day care or in-home care help offer caregivers a short break, which allows you valuable time to focus on your own essential needs, physical health, and emotional support. Knowing what kind of respite care options are available and how to access them is important for any Alzheimer’s caregiver.

How Respite Care Can Help

As most experienced caregivers know, stepping away briefly is not a luxury, it’s often a necessity. Caregiver burnout can happen to anyone. Respite care services can help in these, and many more, ways: 1,2,3

It lets you rest and relax.Simple acts of self-care can help boost your mental health and keep you stronger for your caregiving responsibilities.
It helps you be a better caregiver.When you’re able to rest and recharge, you’ll have more energy to help your loved one. If you don’t take care of your own needs, you might experience burnout, which can make caregiving even more challenging.
It allows you to maintain life balance.Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s can make it difficult to stay on top of all the other demands on your plate. When you get a break from caregiving, you can get back to other things in your life and return to caregiving with less distractions and more focus.
It helps your loved one fight loneliness and isolation.When a person with Alzheimer’s visits a respite care center, like an adult day care center, they can get to know others who have similar experiences. This can help fight loneliness and isolation. Plus, it keeps your loved one mentally active.
It lets your loved one enjoy special programs.Respite care centers often offer special programs for people with Alzheimer’s, like music therapy, pet therapy, or puzzle-making. These activities help your loved one keep their mind active in a safe, comfortable environment.
It lets you rest and relax.Simple acts of self-care can help boost your mental health and keep you stronger for your caregiving responsibilities.
It helps you be a better caregiver.When you’re able to rest and recharge, you’ll have more energy to help your loved one. If you don’t take care of your own needs, you might experience burnout, which can make caregiving even more challenging.
It allows you to maintain life balance.Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s can make it difficult to stay on top of all the other demands on your plate. When you get a break from caregiving, you can get back to other things in your life and return to caregiving with less distractions and more focus.
It helps your loved one fight loneliness and isolation.When a person with Alzheimer’s visits a respite care center, like an adult day care center, they can get to know others who have similar experiences. This can help fight loneliness and isolation. Plus, it keeps your loved one mentally active.
It lets your loved one enjoy special programs.Respite care centers often offer special programs for people with Alzheimer’s, like music therapy, pet therapy, or puzzle-making. These activities help your loved one keep their mind active in a safe, comfortable environment.

You Can Take Action

Accessing respite care that works for you and your loved one in your community takes just a few simple steps: 1,2,3

Find care near you.You can search online or make phone calls to find local organizations that offer respite care. A few places to start include the Community Resource Finder from AARP and the Alzheimer’s Association (also available at 1-800-272-3900) and the Eldercare Locator from the U.S. Administration on Aging (also available at 1-800-677-1116).
Contact local organizations.Once you’ve found respite care in your community, email the organization or give them a call. Ask any questions you might have and take notes about what they offer. If it sounds like the right fit, ask how you can get started.
Enjoy your time off.Once you’ve set up respite care, use the time to do whatever you want. Try to avoid pressuring yourself about what you “should” do. See friends, get some exercise, or simply rest and relax. The point of respite care is that it’s your time to take care of yourself.
Find care near you.You can search online or make phone calls to find local organizations that offer respite care. A few places to start include the Community Resource Finder from AARP and the Alzheimer’s Association (also available at 1-800-272-3900) and the Eldercare Locator from the U.S. Administration on Aging (also available at 1-800-677-1116).
Contact local organizations.Once you’ve found respite care in your community, email the organization or give them a call. Ask any questions you might have and take notes about what they offer. If it sounds like the right fit, ask how you can get started.
Enjoy your time off.Once you’ve set up respite care, use the time to do whatever you want. Try to avoid pressuring yourself about what you “should” do. See friends, get some exercise, or simply rest and relax. The point of respite care is that it’s your time to take care of yourself.