Living with Alzheimer's disease

Participating in Alzheimer's Research

Participating in Alzheimer’s research and clinical trials is not just a way of contributing to important research, it can also offer a variety of opportunities to get introduced to new forms of testing, care, and treatment. There are research opportunities for many different types of people, including those who have been diagnosed, people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), those with a family history of Alzheimer’s, or anyone who is interested in protecting their brain health.

You Can Take Action

If you’re interested in Alzheimer’s research and clinical trials, follow these steps to see what opportunities are a fit for you:1,2,3,4

Find research projects near you.You can use the National Institute on Aging’s clinical trial search tool to look for research opportunities for Alzheimer’s disease near you. You can also sign up for the A-LIST from UsAgainstAlzheimer’s to receive information and research opportunities. Or, visit the Memory Strings website to see if there are Alzheimer’s research locations in your area.
Pick an opportunity that fits.When you find a research opportunity, check factors like whether you fit the criteria, the distance you’d have to travel, the time each visit would take, how long the research would last and whether you’d be able to complete the entire trial. Keep in mind that some trials may not be right for all age groups or people with certain conditions.
Bring a research partner.If you have Alzheimer’s disease, many clinical trials will require that a caregiver participate along with you during the research. Talk with your caregiver or a family member to make sure you’re both comfortable and ready to participate in a clinical trial.
Complete the trial recruitment process.Before you can start a trial, you’ll need to complete the clinical trial recruitment process. This might involve responding to a questionnaire, sharing your health information, or visiting the research location in-person.
Stay positive and keep looking.Many trials have very specific criteria or needs, so they may choose not to include you for any number of different reasons beyond your control. If this happens to you, don’t take it personally. Just keep looking for research opportunities until you find one that is a good fit for you.
Find research projects near you.You can use the National Institute on Aging’s clinical trial search tool to look for research opportunities for Alzheimer’s disease near you. You can also sign up for the A-LIST from UsAgainstAlzheimer’s to receive information and research opportunities. Or, visit the Memory Strings website to see if there are Alzheimer’s research locations in your area.
Pick an opportunity that fits.When you find a research opportunity, check factors like whether you fit the criteria, the distance you’d have to travel, the time each visit would take, how long the research would last and whether you’d be able to complete the entire trial. Keep in mind that some trials may not be right for all age groups or people with certain conditions.
Bring a research partner.If you have Alzheimer’s disease, many clinical trials will require that a caregiver participate along with you during the research. Talk with your caregiver or a family member to make sure you’re both comfortable and ready to participate in a clinical trial.
Complete the trial recruitment process.Before you can start a trial, you’ll need to complete the clinical trial recruitment process. This might involve responding to a questionnaire, sharing your health information, or visiting the research location in-person.
Stay positive and keep looking.Many trials have very specific criteria or needs, so they may choose not to include you for any number of different reasons beyond your control. If this happens to you, don’t take it personally. Just keep looking for research opportunities until you find one that is a good fit for you.